Kubernetes, DAPR, and Azure Identity Example – Part V

Continuing from part IV of our series, this post will incorporate the DAPR runtime services into the application. The source related to this post is contained in the azure-and-dapr-identity-example repo. Incorporating DAPR Up to this point, nothing we’ve done included DAPR. We’ve just used Kubernetes definitions to assemble the application components. DAPR provides a number…

Kubernetes, DAPR, and Azure Identity Example – Part IV

Continuing from part III of our series, this post will walk through setting up simple back-end services, including a configuration service as well as services that require user authentication. It will also include a service that calls the Microsoft Graph on behalf of the authenticated user. We will be using .NET Core v5 application to…

Kubernetes, DAPR, and Azure Identity Example – Part III

Continuing from part II of our series, we will next walk through setting up user authentication using Azure Active Directory. The source related to this post is contained in the adding-authentication branch of the repo. Creating an AAD Application We will need to register an application with Azure Active Directory. The following are links to…

Kubernetes, Dapr, and Azure Identity Example – Part II

Continuing from part I of our series, we will next step through building a simple, front end web application, deploying it to the Kubernetes cluster, then exposing it to the outside world via a Kubernetes Ingress. The source related to this post is contained in the building-frontend-app branch of the repo. Building a Web Front…

Kubernetes, Dapr, and Azure Identity Example – Part I

Introduction In this series of posts, we will walk you through setting up a static website (SPA), user authentication using Azure Active Directory (AAD), and simple authenticated services, all within a Kubernetes cluster using DAPR services. The source code is located at https://github.com/dfbaskin/azure-and-dapr-identity-example. There are separate branches related to the different posts. This example was…

Three Azure-Native Storage Options for Azure Kubernetes Service

Azure Kubernetes Services (AKS) is one of the most versatile platforms on Azure. It can be tailored to run just about any kind of workload that you can throw at it ranging from a simple website to big data that requires access to massively scalable compute. One of the options that is most tunable on…
N-Tier App

When to Use a Service Mesh with Kubernetes

If one has been around the Kubernetes space for any significant amount of time, one has probably heard the words, “service mesh” mentioned, or at least some implementation of one such as Istio, Linkered, or Consul. At first, one might wonder why one would need to add something to Kubernetes, an already complex package that…
Containers

All The Ways to Run Containers on Azure

Containers are no longer the best kept secret in IT. Practically everywhere I go, I hear of organizations using containers for everything from small projects to mission critical 24×7 applications with 99.999% uptime SLA’s. These kinds of projects all have a myriad of different requirements and drivers that go into making the decision of where…

Getting Started with Kubernetes Webinar

In this intro to Kubernetes webinar, we’ll give you a primer on Kubernetes and show you how to get started using Kubernetes for container orchestration. We’ll talk about the pieces of Kubernetes, show you how they work together, and finally show you how you can get your containers running on Kubernetes locally and in a…
swarm vs kubernetes

Why “Kubernetes vs. Swarm” is the Wrong Question

Kubernetes is getting a lot of attention these days. The container industry has coalesced around Kubernetes. And for this reason, many people are giving eulogies for Docker Swarm. While Kubernetes is incredibly popular, the dominance of Kubernetes does not imply the death of Swarm. These two systems do have overlap, but they approach a similar…